3,110 publications on the subject, selecting 25 of these which published 26 studies

Each day more data emerges which shows that oral contraception increases the risk of venous thrombosis in women who use these drugs. Now a systematic review provides a comprehensive examination of this issue and confirms this risk, qualifying that there are some oral contraceptives which represent a greater risk of developing venous thrombosis than others (BMJ doi: 10.1136/bmj.f5259. Published).

Contraceptives objective risk

In particular, this study reviews 3,110 publications on the subject, selecting 25 of these which published 26 studies. The meta-analysis confirms that the incidence of venous thrombosis among non-users of oral contraceptives is from 1.9 to 3.7 per 10,000 women/year, which are consistent with the results of previous studies. The use of oral contraceptives increases the risk of venous thrombosis by 3.5. This study also confirmed that the combined oral contraceptive pill, which contains 30 or 35 mg of ethinyestradiol and a progestogen such as desogestrel, cyproterone acetate or drospirenone, increases this risk by 50 to 80% more than oral contraceptives which only contain levonorgestrel.

The authors conclude that the oral contraceptive drugs evaluated in this study increase the risk of venous thrombosis among women who use them, and that this side-effect depends on both the type of progestogen and the amount of ethinyestradiol used in the drug.

Civil proceeding are frecuent in this issue (see HERE).

While it is certainly true that conclusive data is rare in medical science, we can still, on occasion, look to systematic reviews such as the one described here for data that comes quite close to a definitive answer, which in this case, concluded that oral contraception increase the risk of venous thrombosis among women who use this type of medication.

See HERE more side effects few commented by pharmaceutical industry