The American Society of Reproductive Medicine considers ethically acceptable for the physicians to refuse to transfer these types of embryos, despite the parents’ wishes

After having performed preimplantation genetic diagnosis , the ethical problem may arise of whether the physicians responsible for the case should transfer an embryo that presents objective genetic abnormalities if the parents wish to have this procedure carried out. In a recent paper (see HERE) published by Fertility and Sterilty, the Ethics Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine issued their opinion in this respect, concluding that the problem is complex, since there is the possibility, albeit rare, that an embryo that has been diagnosed with genetic problems may result in the birth of a genetically normal child. It seems that the Committee considers it ethically acceptable for the physicians responsible to refuse to transfer these types of embryos, despite the parents’ wishes; however, when the embryo has a problem that is assumed to be treatable after birth, it is ethically acceptable for the physicians transfer the embryo if the parents so request.

An objective eugenics statemet

Our bioethical assessemnt. While this is undoubtedly a challenging problem, we believe there are no medical or ethical reasons that justify refusal to transfer an embryo with a genetic disorder if that is what its parents want. We believe that the right to autonomy of the parents to decide on the life of their children should prevail over that of physicians.