Should they explore avenues through which these two fields could find solutions to the emergencies that humanity is facing?

According to an article published in The Lancet in April 2017 (see HERE), a large group of experts met in Rome, invited by Cardinal Ravasi, President of the Pontifical Council for Culture, to reflect on “The Future of Humanity through the Lens of Medical Science). The main purpose was to try to reduce the schism that sometimes arises between science and religion (see HERE), and to explore avenues through which these two fields could find solutions to the emergencies that humanity is facing.

The Conference agenda included topics as important as climate change, migration, disability and genome editing, among others.

A key conclusion of this conference was that the relationship between science and religion should be based on true dialogue, rather than on confrontation.  An example of this can be found in the scientific world’s response to Pope Francis’s encyclical Laudato Si, in which he criticized irresponsible development, condemned environmental degradation and global warming, and called upon the peoples of the world to promote joint global action.

Finally, during this important meeting, a lively discussion arose on the tension that often appears between science and religion regarding the value of human life (see HERE) and futile medical care.  To address these matters, the Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research and the Lancet have proposed creating a Commission to study the value of life in more depth. One of the aims of this Commission is to create a space for reflection and constructive thought in topics as important as end-of-life care and genome editing, issues with an extraordinarily important bioethical background that we often discuss in Bioethics News (see HERE Archive).