The United States is starting to lose the war against sexually transmitted diseases who appears to be a West trend. The main issues are syphilis and gonorrhea. Syphilis rates increased by roughly 18 percent from 2015 to 2016.
The majority of the cases occurred in men, particularly gay and bisexual men. Syphilis is also characterized by a high rate of HIV coinfection. Nearly 50 percent of gay and bisexual men with syphilis were also HIV-positive, compared with 10 percent of heterosexual men.

The main issues are syphilis and gonorrhea. Syphilis rates increased by roughly 18 percent from 2015 to 2016.

Congenital syphilis
The disease is also appearing more frequently in babies, being passed down from their mothers. The rate of that condition, known as congenital syphilis, nearly doubled to 632 cases between 2012 and 2016 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 28,000 cases of syphilis were reported last year. Individuals aged 15 to 24 are the most affected age group. These sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have been increasing in frequency since 2014. That was after a large downward for years (Health Line October 9, 2017).

Similar trends in Europe

In the United Kingdom, according to data from Public Health England (PHE), the number of cases of syphilis has reached the highest level since 1949 and cases of the infection have almost doubled since 2012.
Dr Michael Brady, the medical director for the Terrence Higgins Trust, a sexual health charity, said: “Today’s figures show unacceptably high rates of STIs. We’re facing huge challenges, such as the continued rise of syphilis and ongoing concerns around drug-resistant gonorrhoea, and we urgently need to address the nation’s poor sexual health and rates of STIs in those most at risk.” (The Guardian, 6 Jun 2017)