The Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas and the Baylor Scott & White Research Institute unveiled that a third baby (girl) had been born in a uterus transplant clinical trial, in a case of absolute uterine factor infertility. This latest birth is the result of an altruistic transplant from a living donor, in which neither the donor nor the recipient knows the identity of the other. The Baylor Medical Center has already performed a total of 20 uterus transplants, making it the largest program of its kind in the world.

Third baby -girl- born after uterus                        transplant

An article about the project of Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas was published last September which has, in our opinion, objective bioethical implications (see HERE our approach on this relevant topic). Here we extract what, in our opinion, is more interesting:

“We are honored to have helped this family welcome their new baby and humbled by the selfless act of the organ donor who made this pregnancy a possibility,” said Giuliano Testa, MD, principal investigator of the uterus transplant clinical trial at Baylor University Medical Center, chief of abdominal transplantation, and chairman, Baylor Annette C. and Harold C. Simmons Transplant Institute.

Option for women with absolute uterine factor infertility

“Each delivery is further evidence that uterus transplantation is a viable option for women with absolute uterine factor infertility,” said Liza Johannesson, MD. Ph.D. gynecologic surgeon and medical director of uterus transplantation at Baylor University Medical Center.

Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas is among the first in the U.S. to explore uterus transplantation, which is being studied as a new infertility treatment option for women with absolute uterine factor infertility, meaning their uterus is nonfunctioning or nonexistent. The clinical trial team led by principal investigator Giuliano Testa, MD, has now performed a total of 20 uterus transplants, making it the largest program in the world.


The team: specialties including transplant, gynecology, obstetrics, maternal/fetal medicine and psychology”


As a major academic medical center with one of the nation’s top transplant programs, Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas attributes the success of this clinical trial to a multidisciplinary team of physicians, nurses, and research investigators in a range of specialties including transplant, gynecology, obstetrics, maternal/fetal medicine and psychology. The medical team has more than 35 years of experience helping women have babies while taking immunosuppressive medications following organ transplantation. With the support of Baylor Scott & White Research Institute, this innovative program is committed to advancing the science of uterus transplantation for the benefit of the broader medical community and women living with uterine factor infertility.

[…] Philanthropic support for this innovative clinical trial was provided by Baylor Scott & White Foundation – Dallas. The Foundation is seeking additional funds to continue this research, which could potentially benefit other women with absolute uterine infertility via this pioneering procedure.”

Our opinion

Uterus transplant is without a doubt a pioneer promising technique but has bioethical implications. We made an evaluation in a preview report, in relation to both the donor as well as the recipient and the child (see HERE ).