They found that just over 18 percent of the children born to mothers highly exposed to ultrafine particle air pollution developed asthma

The move to avoid the birth of children with congenital health problems is a standard practice worldwide using prenatal genetic tests, but the effects of parents’ behavior and non-genetic factors on the health of newborns are less studied and appear to be less perceived by the population. For example, as our Observatory reported, Sperm quality depends on age and it is an important risk factor when fatherhood is increasingly delayed and Behavior of the father before conception affects the child’s development.

In this respect, an article published on Mail Online (May 21, 2021) reports a scientific study that warns that “pregnant women who are exposed to high levels of air pollution are more likely to have children with asthma” (read the full article HERE).

pregnant women exposed to pollution

Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York studied 376 mothers and their babies who live in the Boston metropolitan area and were already being followed to assess their health. The aim was to understand whether exposure to ultra-fine particles in air pollution during pregnancy could be passed on to infants and to what degree it could affect their development.

Pregnant women exposed to pollution are more likely to have children with asthma

They found that just over 18 percent of the children born to mothers highly exposed to ultrafine particle air pollution developed asthma. In comparison, just 7 percent of children overall in the US identify as having asthma.

Author Dr. Rosalind Wright, who led the study, said “One reason ultra-fine particulates are not routinely monitored is that there have been a number of unique challenges to measuring them accurately. Fortunately, recent methods have been developed to provide such exposure data which allowed us to conduct this study”.

Our Observatory hopes that more pregnant women can avoid this type of exposure in our highly polluted cities.