Professionals must always perform any treatment that a patient may request? – See video below about the role of  conscience in medicine

Savulescu and Schuklenk have proposed the concept “incompatibility thesis” (see HERE), which defines that the professional duties of healthcare practitioners are not compatible with a request for conscientious objection (see our bioethical opinion HERE)  and that these professionals must always perform any treatment that a patient may request. In contrast to this thesis, the “compromise approach” holds that conscientious objection is compatible with good medical practice if it does not present an impediment to a patient’s access to the good or service. A recent article in Bioethics, discusses both theses, concluding that the thesis of Savulescu and Schuklenk is “simply unprofessional” and ethically erroneous, but it also argues that conscientious objection may be exercised provided that it does not present an impediment to a patient’s access to the good or service.

Our statement

Due to the fact that physician burnout is a worrying matter in health care is urgent to analyze conscientious objection to participating in medical practices, either for religious reasons or ethical, deontological and professional oaths. We believe that the increasing burnout manifested by medical professionals (see HERE) has some relation to the pressure they are submitted for this reason.

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